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Author Topic: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature  (Read 39051 times)

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jollyquilter

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2008, 09:40:07 PM »

We also put a dab of petroleum jelly on the blade after we dry it.

My dh and I try real hard to use water sparingly... ::) we must be doing a good job, they came out today and changed our water meter. They said it was not registering ENOUGH water usage.  :lol :lol . The joke is on them!!!
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2008, 10:16:23 PM »

Nice idea plus you get a lubricated razor each time.   :)
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2008, 09:04:32 AM »

It's about 20 degrees F. here this morning.  Wish we had the funds to install a tankless water heater but we will have to put in an additional electrical service for it so it is not in the cards for the foreseeabe future.  I hate to have to let water run until it gets hot so I can shave in the morning.  I'm tighter than bark on a tree so it really pains me to see all that clean water go down the drain (no really efficient way to catch it for re-use) while I'm waiting for it to heat up.  Sooooo, I heat water up the previous night and put it in a thermos that I put on the bathroom sink.  Next morning, I use that water instead.  It's piping hot and I actually use less water as there is no temptation to leave the hot water running while I'm shaving.  It's nice to start the day saving money and conserving water.  When the weather is right, I can even heat the water for the thermos using my parabolic solar cooker--it'll stay hot for 24 hours.  This is a great way to still enjoy one of the comforts of home in a grid-down situation.
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2008, 09:24:20 AM »

Forgot to mention that I still have enough hot water left to make a cup or two of instant hot chocolate (sugar-free of course!) or coffee or tea.  Could use it to make a bowl of instant oatmeal instead.....you get the picture.
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shymom

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2008, 09:30:18 AM »

It's about 20 degrees F. here this morning.  Wish we had the funds to install a tankless water heater but we will have to put in an additional electrical service for it so it is not in the cards for the foreseeabe future.  I hate to have to let water run until it gets hot so I can shave in the morning. 

Looks like you have a found a good work around for waiting for hot water.   :hat

We have a tankless heater in our studio and honestly the thing I hate most about it is how much water has to run before it gets hot. A lot of it depends upon how far away the heater is from the point of use. Ours is, of course, on the opposite side of the building from the bathroom and laundry area.  (The good thing is we aren't constantly heating water that goes unused.)
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2009, 10:03:37 AM »

Dehydrator - Was looking over the Excalibur dehydrator site and read an interesting use for a dehydrator.  If you live in an area with cold winter temps like I do here in WV, you probably don't do much composting during the winter as it's a pain to take the stuff outside and there's not much composting action going on in the bin.  Excalibur advises to dehydrate your compost during the winter and simply put it in the bin during the warmer months.  This is most likely going to be a hard sell to the wife but I see no problem with dehydrating potatoe skins and such--just make sure the dry compost is not stored with the foodstuffs.
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #26 on: April 01, 2009, 02:14:32 PM »

Poor Man's Hot Tub - No, this is not an April Fool's joke.  Get at least two of the biggest, thickest, black trash bags you can find and place one inside the other (to make the "tub" stronger).  Put it on a level spot in a sunny area in the morning.  Fill with as much water as you can.  Tie the bags closed.  Let them sit in the sun all day.  Depending on modesty and preplanning by placing in an enclosure perhaps privacy fencing, open the bag and get inside at the end of the day.  You're gonna have to hold it closed or use those garbage bag tie straps typically part of the bag.  You may want to have some cold water for cooling if it's too hot.  It would probably be a good idea to put some padding under the bags prior to filling them.  Should be able to reuse your "tub" a few times.  The price is right.  Great for a bet that you have a portable hot tub you can carry in your pocket.   ::D
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chloe

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2009, 06:21:48 PM »

Well  :?
First let me say I would be hard pressed to use my dehydrator to compost
But then living in the south it isn't hard to get to the compost pile
-----________________ -------- ____________  -------- __________  -----________________ -------- ____________  -------- Now for the hot tub -- I got a mental pic of myself trying to use it. I have to admit
I was  :giggle at the site.

I can see where the idea is appealing but to actually be able to get in without most of the
water escaping would be hard.
Now if you had some sort of frame ( something about the size of a hula hoop)  to fold the bag over might work
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2009, 06:30:15 PM »

Yep, as I was taking my walk I thought it would be much easier if you had a frame of some sort.  Otherwise, it's much like sliding into a sleeping bag and pulling it up.  This is one I won't be testing as I hate hot water and cold water.  I'm a warm/cool water bathing person.  But, for a hot soak for tired muscles, this might do the trick.
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BelovedChild

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #29 on: April 01, 2009, 07:41:26 PM »

Petrol locking caps.
I don't know about USA, but here in Australia, all new cars for years have the opening of the petrol container only accessible by the driver.  it is usally a small catch, when pulled will open the petrol cap door.  Inside the car door is the real petrol cap which you remove to fill the car with petrol.  No more petrol pinching

I have found that if you hang pants by the legs   on a proper pants hanger and place int he wardrobe, that the weight of the rest does pull on the seams and straightens them.  It only works on items that do not really need ironing.
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2009, 12:27:36 PM »

How to Pull a Van Up a Hill With Only a Rope - Neat instructable with how-to videos of not only the method but how to tie the knots.

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-pull-a-van-uphill-with-only-a-rope---upda/
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2010, 11:32:23 AM »

Getting a Quick Hot Fire in a Fireplace Insert Tips:
Tip 1:  We have a fireplace insert and a pellet stove in an all-electric home.  Most often we do not need the pellet stove (it's in the kitchen--only place we could put it) and it is used mainly as a backup heating system since it can be solar powered and we get plenty heat already in the kitchen as long as there is grid electricity.  Consequently we have an abundance (a few tons) of pellets.  I have found that sometimes it is difficult to get the fireplace insert fire to really get going fast and hot enough despite seasoned wood, waxed sawdust fire starter, a clean chimney, and a good draw (heating the chimney pipe by burning some newspaper on top of the wood first).  If I put pellet stove pellets in cardboard tubes such as toilet paper tubes and paper towel tubes and seal the tubes simply by folding the ends and lighting the tube, I get a prolonged hot source to put by the wood to get the fire going well, especially if the wood has some dampness.  Re-use, recycle as they say.  Which leads to Tip 2:  Sometimes even with the above advantages the fire is slow to get going.  That's when I pull out the secret weapon--my wife's old blow dryer, the one that won't do the heat setting anymore but will still yet put out a strong air current.  Aim it at the base of the fire and you get all the power you need to get a really hot flame started on the wood.  No electricity?  I use one of my many handheld battery powered personal fans instead but they pale in comparison to the blow dryer.  Naw, I just can't throw away a blow dryer because the heat setting doesn't work any more. 
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CountryLady

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2010, 05:17:51 PM »

:lol :ty2 Dan. Helpful and PRICELESS~! :ROFL
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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2010, 08:40:53 AM »

magispook clark howard the radio guy and all around tightwad says he uses the say razor blades i think 2 or 3 a year. He says the secret to keeping them sharp is to dry the blades immediately after use.
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2010, 10:35:05 AM »

I do dry mine but I rarely get a month's use most likely because I buy the cheap ones.
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jollyquilter

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2010, 09:11:06 PM »

I dry mine and I rub a bit of petroleum jelly on after. I bought one of those forever razors    ( as seen on TV)for myself for christmas 2009 and I am still using it. I also make glycerin soap in a mug to shave with for myself and dh and he says his blades last longer even though he  does not dry or lubricate it.
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2010, 09:34:27 PM »

I use glycerin soap for shaving as well.  Good stuff.  Otherwise, Dr. Bronner's.
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jollyquilter

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2010, 10:12:14 PM »

I just about forgot about this one. With all that has been going on around here I have been very forgetful. And my stopper in my  kitchen sink is not working so I need a new one. I have had it on the list for weeks now and just seem to always make it home without it.

Well here is what I did and it works great. I took a sandwich bag and filled about a 3rd with water. Now get all the air out and seal the zipper. Place over the drain and allow it to sealjust like the stopper would.  :clap
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Magispook

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2010, 02:50:11 PM »

A tip my wife got from a Korean website:  Cut open a washed milk carton after it's empty.  Cut off top and bottom.  Lay the resultant rectangle out with the former inside facing up and the former outside facing down.  You now have a foldable, reusable cutting mat measuring about 7.5 inches by 15 inches for your home or field kitchen.  Packs small and light.  Re-use.  Recycle.  Speaking of small, light, and foldable, I discovered a simple method for a cheap solar cooker.  I've built one but there will be no opportunity to test it until the latter part of this week due to weather.  Once I verify it works well, I'll post results and instructions here.   :)
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CountryLady

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Re: Tips and Tricks of a Miscellaneous Nature
« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2010, 04:34:23 AM »

A wooden toothpick, broom straw, or sliver carved from a twig can tighten a loose knob, wobbly chair leg, etc. Unscrew the knob, put the toothpick all the way down in the hole, next to the side of the hole and screw the knob back on, and it should be nice and tight. I have a knob that needs this treatment right now. :giggle
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