Author Topic: Wild Vegetations  (Read 3832 times)

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Offline aviax2

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2014, 08:07:01 PM »
 :grockz1:

Great thread! Way too much for me to take in at once so will have to come back to it.

My mother loved to cook poke salet and all though she tried to get us to eat it she didn't make us LOL. I hated the smell of it cooking. I did however enjoy eating spinach that was served at school when I was really young so go figure.

I've had the poke stalk fried like okra as a grown up and I remember it being good. Growing up I had always heard that anything other than the leaf was poison.

So interesting about using it as medicine.

Avia

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Offline chloe

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2014, 10:36:25 AM »
Mare's Tail:

This vigorous crack-dweller has a dozen names, a sure sign that most people consider it unsightly and invasive. It is one of those "oh, so that's what it is" kind of weeds. Also known as horseweed and, more properly, Conyza canadensis, the mare's tail is prolific in both rural and urban settings and will grow with hardly any water or soil straight and tall, up to 4 feet high. Again, that's a lot of food.
 
The leaves are most palatable when young. By midsummer, only the top foot or so of a 3-foot plant is tender enough to eat after a quick boil. They are peppery and, in fact, you can dry them as a spice. As with many dark, leafy greens, the plant is a decent source of calcium, potassium and other minerals.
 
And now for some Boy Scout trivia: Mare's tail is the weed of choice for making a fire via the drill-friction method. The very straight, hard stem rotates perfectly between the hands to make heat. What other plant can make the fire needed to cook it?

among 5-edible-garden
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As for food, young leafy seedlings  and young leaves can be eaten after boiling, dried leaves can be used as a seasoning with a flavor similar to tarragon. American Indians pulverized the young tops and leaves, eating them raw, similar to using an onion. Per 100g of dry weight the leaves have a small amount of protein and fat, more fiber, good amount of carbohydrates, 8.2 grams ash, 1010 mg of calcium, 280 mg phosphorus, and 2610 mg potassium. An essential oil of Conyza is used to flavor candy, condiments and soda. Fresh leaves contain 0.2 0.66% essential oil.

more info


Great picture of the plant (PDF)

plus more info


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Offline chloe

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2014, 03:16:58 PM »

Burdock,

Also known as gobo or Arctium lappa, is a edible plant native to Asia, although it now grows wild over much of North America and Europe and is considered a weed by many gardeners. Cooked burdock root is crunchy and has a mild flavor similar to potatoes or artichokes, and it can be used in soups and stir fries. Burdock root tea has traditionally been used as a detoxifier to treat acne, infections and liver problems

Step 1
Learn to positively identify burdock if you are harvesting it in the wild and are not growing it in a garden setting. Burdock grows up to 7 feet tall and has large, arrow-shaped leaves on thick stalks. The root is fat and deep. Mature plants produce spiky purple flowers similar to thistles and seed burrs that stick to clothing or fur. Always consult multiple sources to verify an identification before eating any wild plant. Most field guides to wild edibles should provide you with more information and illustrations for identifying wild burdock root.

Step 2
Locate young burdock plants to dig. Burdock is a biennial, and the root become woody and unappetizing after the first year. Choose first-year burdock plants with only a rosette of leaves near the ground. Avoid plants with flowers or a flower stalk. First- year burdock root may be harvested in the summer or fall.

Step 3
Dig a hole next to the burdock you wish to harvest. Begin digging a few inches away from the burdock stalk and dig down at least 1 foot. Burdock roots may be 2 or more feet long. Loosen the soil next to the root with your fingers or a hand trowel.

Step 4
Press the shovel into the soil next to the burdock root on the opposite side of the hole you dug. Lean into the shovel to push the burdock root out of the hole.

Step 5

Trim off leaves and feeder roots and rinse well. Do not peel. Store fresh burdock root in the refrigerator for a week or more to use as a food, or slice it thinly and dry it in a dehydrator or low oven to use medicinally
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The root is similar in size, shape and preparation methods to a carrot and can be used for soups, stews, braised as a vegetable side dish, or stir-fried with other vegetables and grains. It is also ground into bits to be added to foods as a health supplement or to be brewed into tea beverages. To prepare, wash the roots under cold water to thoroughly remove all dirt and particles. If desired, peel the thin outer skin away from the flesh. After being peeled, the Burdock Root should be cut into desired lengths and placed in water to preserve the freshness and light color until it is ready to be cooked. When exposed to air, the flesh begins to darken. The Burdock Root can also be prepared without being peeled. When cooked with the outer skin on, this root is more flavorful and sweeter tasting. The Burdock Root is also known as gobo, the Japanese word for the edible burdock, as well as butterbur and beggar's bottom.
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USDA Nutrition Facts
 
Burdock root, raw (USDA#11104)

Serving Size 1 cup (1" pieces)
 
 Calories 72 ,Protein 1g . Total Fat 0g ,.Total Carbohydrates 17g ,Dietary Fiber 3g
 Sugars 2g ,Potassium 308mg ,Sodium 5mg ,Cholesterol 0mg


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Offline chloe

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #18 on: September 08, 2014, 10:31:30 AM »
Sassafras

Sassafras can be a shrug or a tree. The flowers are greenish-yellow, they grow in clusters. 
The bark of Sassafras is gray-brown with big wrinkles, Sassafras twigs are green.

Oil from Sassafras sap, taken from the bark and roots, is used to perfume soap, and to flavor tea and root beer. It is also used to flavor the Cajun dish called gumbo.

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If you tear or crush sassafras leaves, they smell like root beer. You can make tea from the leaves by pouring boiling water over a small handful and letting them seep off heat for a few minutes, straining out the leaves.

The roots of a sapling make a better tea. It also makes a great jelly. Brew three strong cups and follow the Sure Jell recipe.

Sassafras fruit resembles a blue berry in a red cup. It is NOT edible.

A lot more about Sassafras

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To see what the plant looks like check out

googles Images



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Offline aviax2

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2014, 11:47:51 AM »
My paternal grandmother was a big believer in tea to cure your ailments and I can remember her making me sassafras tea when I had the measles. I have no memory of how it actually tasted or if it did any good but just the fact that she came while I was sick and made me something special was enough to make me feel better. She had a way of making even a cup of plain old Lipton tea into something special!
Avia

"Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company." 
                                                                    --Booker T. Washington

Offline Elle Mae

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Re: Wild Vegetations
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2014, 12:04:49 PM »
Sassafras tea is awesome Aviax2!!!  I would drink it daily if it was available to me.  My dad was a firm believer of sassafras tea and horehound candy if you had a sore throat.  I don't know if it really worked or if it was just a placebo, but I know I always felt better after I had some.


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